BET: Second Hebrew Letter Meaning

BET: Second Hebrew Letter Meaning

The letter Bet is the second letter of the Hebrew AlphaBet. Being the second letter, obviously its numerical value is two.

What does the second hebrew letter Bet mean? The Bet letter means house, and we’ll see how the meaning of the letter comes through its form and its number.

The idea of house is a very basic one on the level of worlds souls and divinity. On the level of worlds we all have this experience that we spend much of our time in what we’ll call houses.

Houses here means in the wider context buildings, we learn in buildings, we work in buildings we live in buildings, we go to entertainment in buildings. In other words idea of house runs to all of physical reality.

On the level of soul, the body is the house to the soul. Therefore every person has this experience of having their soul housed in a body.

On the level of divinity, all of creation is a house as it were in relationship to God. This explains why, at least one of the many explanations, why the Torah itself begins with a Bet.

Because from God’s perspective, the entire world is so to speak, his house. This is a beautiful example of how the name of the number can be seen in the level of worlds, souls, and divinity.

Letter Bet in The Book of Zohar

Now that we’ve mentioned that the Torah begins with a Bet, will continue by saying there’s a book called the “Tikunay Zohar”.

Zohar is one of the most fundamental books of all of Kabbalah, and it spends the entire book is about this first word of the Torah “Bereshit”, meaning-in the beginning.

One of the permutations of the word Bereshit, is the head of the house, meaning as it were God who is the head, enters in two finite reality his house.

In the reasons given why God created the world, one of the most enigmatic one is a phrase from the “Midrash” that says, that God had a desire to have for himself a dwelling in the lower places.

This is enigmatic, because an infinite God we asked why does he need a lower reality, and yet we’re told that this is God’s desire and this is the secret of the “Mishkan” the tabernacle in the desert, and later the two temples in Jerusalem, and in our day a “Bet Knesset”- a synagogue, that the temple represented creating a house, a dwelling place for God in this world.

In Conclusion

This very much speaks about what Torah and Judaism teaches us as to our role and a relationship with God, that we want to make a dwelling place for God, not only in the physical universe but within our hearts, within our souls.